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Posts tagged ‘Daniel movement’

The Daniel Fast for the 2011 New Year

It’s hard to know how many men, women and teens around the world start the New Year with an extended period of prayer and fasting. Estimates range from hundreds of thousands to millions. One thing we know for sure is that the trend is gaining. Very likely, more people than ever will begin 2011 with a New Year fast.  It seems that the preferred method of fasting is the Daniel Fast, which is a partial fast where some foods are consumed and others are restricted.

There is no “official” date to start the 21-day New Year fast, but from what I’ve been able to gather from my research and from the hundreds of email messages I receive each week, most people will begin the 2011 New Year Fast on Sunday, January 9th and complete the fast on Sunday, January 30th.

In years gone by, the common start date for the New Year fast is the first Sunday in January. However, since that’s on January 3rd in 2011, and so close to the New Year when many families will be traveling, many leaders have decided to start the New Year fast on the following Sunday, January 9th.

Jentezen Franklin, the pastor at Free Chapel churches in Gainesville, GA and Irvine, CA has been a prominent promoter of the New Year fast. He teaches about prayer and fasting in the churches he pastors and on his television broadcasts. Many of those joining Jentezen Franklin in this corporate fast will use the Daniel Fast as their method of fasting.

A corporate fast is when as few as three and as many as thousands of Christians join together for a period of prayer and fasting. Many church leaders call their congregations to a period of corporate prayer and fasting. Likewise, many leaders of Christian causes will ask those called to provoking change in the world through intercession to join in a corporate fast. During this time, those fasting will pray for God’s will to be accomplished in the matter for which they are praying.

But you don’t need to fast with other people. Many individuals choose to start the New Year with a period of prayer and fasting for personal needs or to pray for the needs of those who God has placed in their care. Many husbands and wives choose to start the New Year with prayer and fasting and if they have children who are old enough to be introduced to the spiritual discipline of prayer and fasting, it might be a family practice.

Personally, I think it’s wise to start the New Year with prayer and fasting. The purpose of fasting is to draw closer to God, to pray that His will be done, and to study the Word and the ways of the Lord. In these shaky times you and I can either be controlled by circumstances and the tough times – or we can partner with the Lord and through our prayer release His will into our lives and our situations.

If you want learn more about the Daniel Fast, receive a copy of the Daniel Fast Guidelines or find helpful resources that will assist you toward a successful fast, visit www.Daniel-Fast.com and join with hundreds of thousands of men, women and teens around the world as they focus their lives on God for a powerful period of prayer and fasting.

How to End a Daniel Fast

Many men and women will complete their 21-day Daniel Fast over the weekend. And so I wanted to post some advice about ending your fast. Even if you are not concluding your fast, please keep this information in mind. It is important.

  • Ease back into your “typical diet.” This is especially true with caffeine, sugar, fatty foods, meat and dairy products. Small portions are wise and go slow, perhaps just one or two foods per day.
  • For caffeine beverages, drink one small cup or glass and then see how your body reacts. Don’t be surprised if you get the “jitters.” Consider starting with de-caf (I realize that’s almost criminal for those of us who love the java). 🙂
  • Don’t be surprised if you feel tired after you start eating the “typical foods.” Your body has been detoxed over the 21-day Daniel Fast and it might scoff at what it has to digest!
  • Continue to drink lots of filtered water, at least 1/2 gallon a day.

Also, consider the lessons you’ve learned and the good habits you’ve adopted on the Daniel Fast. Don’t leave them behind, but let them become a regular part of your life. This includes your prayer and study time with the Lord as well as improved eating habits.

Finally, while you may always fast at the New Year, consider fasting at other times of the year. Many parents pray and then fast from dawn to dusk on their children’s birthdays. If you have pressing issues or circumstances facing you, consider a time of consecrated prayer and fasting. Last year I fasted during Pentecost seeking the Lord’s direction for some personal business matters.

The Daniel Fast is an excellent method for a partial fast. It beats John the Baptist’s fast — honey and locust!

Be blessed!

Join with millions for the 2009 Daniel Fast

Over the last several years millions of Christians have joined in the Daniel Fast. Perhaps one of the strongest promoters of the fast is Pastor Jentezen Franklin, an on fire preacher from Gainsville, Georgia. By the way, note that his name is spelled differently. Many people search for “Jentzen Franklin” and miss him. His first name has an extra “e.”

Jentezen Franklin first challenged members of his church to enter the Fasting Movement several years ago. Their results were so powerful, both corporately and for the individuals, that they were all convinced of the power of prayer and fasting!

What is the Daniel Fast? It’s a time that an individual or group sets aside to fast and pray for specific purposes. While there is no absolute length of time, the most popular is a 21-day Daniel Fast, in which one limits their diet to those described in the first chapter of Daniel. To learn more about Daniel and why he chose to eat specific foods, please see my other post titled “What is the Daniel Fast.”

This site is specifically designed to be a place where believers can learn about the Daniel Fast and communicate with each other.

I hope to draw at least 1000 Christians who will commit to the fast and log their name on this blog. If you want to commit to the 2009 Danial Fast, please go to this link and leave your information:

Sign me up for the 2009 New Years Fast

Let’s see how many we can enlist . . . and then support one another through prayer, information, and wisdom.

Sign up for the Fast

As wild as this may be, we are going to try and keep a list of all Christian men and women who are joining in the January 2008 Fasting Movement. Leave your name and city in the comment field below and I will add you to the list. Let me know how you want to be listed and your city and state!

Example listings:

  • Jan and Dennis, Gainesville, GA
  • Jan and Dennis Smith, Gainesville, GA
  • J & D, Gainesville, GA
  • GeorgiaPeach, Gainesville, GA (User Name instead of Real Name)

 Look who’s Fasting!

Susan Gregory, Ellensburg, WA

Lentil Soup

2 tablespoons olive oil, plus extra for drizzling

1 medium onion, chopped

2 carrots, peeled and chopped

2 celery stalks, chopped

2 garlic cloves, chopped

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 (14 1/2-ounce) can diced tomatoes

1 pound lentils (approximately 1 1/4 cups)

2/3 cup pearl barley

11 cups vegetable broth (can substitute water)

4 to 6 fresh thyme sprigs  

  1. Heat the oil in a heavy large pot over medium heat. Add the onion, carrots, and celery. Add the garlic, salt, and pepper and sauté until all the vegetables are tender, about 5 to 8 minutes.
  2. Add the tomatoes with their juices. Simmer until the juices evaporate a little and the tomatoes break down, stirring occasionally, about 8 minutes.
  3. Add the lentils and pearl barley, mix to coat. Add the broth and stir. Add the thyme sprigs. Bring to a boil over high heat.
  4. Cover and simmer over low heat until the lentils and barley are tender, about 40 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.

Ladle the soup into bowls, drizzle with olive oil and serve.

Six Servings

 

Greek Vegetable Stew

Recipes from: A Taste of Tradition, the Friends of St. Mary’s Russian Orthodox Church, Coaldale, PA

2 tablespoons oil
2 onions, chopped
1 pound green string beans, broken in half
1 package frozen or fresh spinach
4 cups water
6 zucchini, chunked
4 yellow squash, chunked
2 cups celery leaves
4 tomatoes, quartered
1 teaspoon salt
8 slices lemon
1 tablespoon dried oregano
3 tablespoons fresh basil
2 cloves chopped garlic
2 tablespoons lemon juice 
 

Lightly brown onions in a hot dry skillet in 2 Tablespoons oil. Add oregano & garlic. Cook 1 minute. Add 4 cups water and tomatoes. Cook 10 minutes. Add remaining ingredients. Cook covered for 40 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve with a lemon slice in each bowl. 

Eight servings.

How Long is the Daniel Fast?

There is no prescribed time in the Daniel Fast. Rather, the Daniel Fast is about limiting the types of food intake to vegetables and water. The word vegetable in the Scripture actually means fruits and vegetables as these were all allowed under the Jewish dietary laws.

Daniel asked the Chief of the eunuchs to allow his three friends and him to eat just vegetables and water for 10 days and then check in to see their condition. But that didn’t end the dietary restrictions to this 10-day period. It appears that instead, this was a lifestyle for Daniel and the others. If the only meat available to them was that which had been offered as sacrifices to idols, they did not eat it.

There was another time in Daniel 10 where he was seeking wisdom from the Lord and he consecrated himself in a fast of vegetables and water for 21 days. This is perhaps why so many link the Daniel Fast with a 21-day fasting period. “In those days, I Daniel, was mourning for three weeks. I at no delicacies, no meat or wine entered my mouth, nor did I anoint myself at all, for the full three weeks.”  Daniel 10:2, 3

There are a couple things we see from this portion of Scripture. One is that it seems that Daniel had resumed eating meat. The meat that he rejected in Chapter 1 was that which had been offered to idols and false gods. For him to consume that meat would defile his body, which he had consecrated (set apart) to the Lord.

Secondly, we see that in this fast, Daniel ate no delicacies. With what is known of diets during that time, this probably referred to breads (especially yeast breads), sweets, and other rich foods.

So when you plan a Daniel Fast, you need to also decide how long you want your fast to be. Most Christians who will enter the 2008 Fast in January chose a 21-day fast. That’s because this is more of a corporate fast with Christians throughout North America  joining together in a common effort to fast and pray.

Not everyone is starting on the same day, however most start on the first few days of January. If you are joining in a corporate fast with your church or a group of believers, then your start date might be determined. Otherwise, this is a prayerful decision you can make.

The same it true with the length of your fast. Remember that this is a spiritual fast, with the Daniel Diet serving as the definition for the foods that you will eat. So planning your fast should be serious and with a purpose.  Spiritual fasting is for spiritual results. So consider your goals.

The common lengths of time for fasting are 1-, 3-, 7-, 10-, 21-, and 40-day fasts. Obviously, there is no set rule for any number of days. If you are new to fasting, you might want to start with 3 or 7 days. If you are more experienced, a 21 day fast is probably the one to match a fast for entering the New Year. The 40-day fasts are generally undertaken only a few times (if ever) in ones lifetime.

Keep in mind that there are many kinds of fasts — and there are numerous types of spiritual fasting. They vary in length and in the types and amounts of food intake. This site focuses on the Daniel Fast as it grows in popularity among the Christian community.

Daniel Fast Food List

“In those days I, Daniel, was mourning three full weeks. I ate no pleasant food, no meat or wine came into my mouth, nor did I anoint myself at all, till three whole weeks were fulfilled.” Daniel 10:2, 3

One of the great things about the Daniel Fast is that you are not limited to any specific amount of food, but rather to the kinds of food you can eat. The Daniel Fast is limited to vegetables (includes fruits) and water.

Special Note: if you have health issues, please be sure to contact your health professional for advice before committing to any fast including the Daniel Fast. If you would like a list of the foods included and excluded in the Daniel Fast to show your doctor, just copy the contents of this page. Also, if you are interested in a collection of recipes that will take you through an entire 21-day Daniel fast, click here.

After answering hundreds of questions about the Daniel Fast, I am updating the food guidelines. My hope is that it will serve as a more complete list. The original list used by many people was issued in a book about fasting. I know the author tried to do the best he could, but that isn’t the same as getting hundreds of questions seeking clarification. So here is the new list that I hope helps.

Please make sure to READ THE LABEL when purchasing packaged, canned or bottled foods. They should be sugar-free and chemical-free. Keep this in mind as you review this list of acceptable foods.

Foods to include in your diet during the Daniel Fast

All fruits. These can be fresh, frozen, dried, juiced or canned. Fruits include but are not limited to apples, apricots, bananas, blackberries, blueberries, boysenberries, cantaloupe, cherries, cranberries, figs, grapefruit, grapes, guava, honeydew melon, kiwi, lemons, limes, mangoes, nectarines,  oranges, papayas, peaches, pears, pineapples, plums, prunes, raisins, raspberries, strawberries, tangelos, tangerines, watermelon

All vegetables. These can be fresh, frozen, dried, juiced or canned. Vegetables include but are not limited to artichokes, asparagus, beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, chili peppers, collard greens, corn, cucumbers, eggplant, garlic, ginger root, kale, leeks, lettuce, mushrooms, mustard greens, okra, onions, parsley, potatoes, radishes, rutabagas, scallions, spinach, sprouts, squashes, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, turnips, watercress, yams, zucchini, veggie burgers are an option if you are not allergic to soy.

All whole grains, including but not limited to whole wheat, brown rice, millet, quinoa, oats, barley, grits, whole wheat pasta, whole wheat tortillas, rice cakes and popcorn.

All nuts and seeds, including but not limited to sunflower seeds, cashews, peanuts, sesame. Also nut butters including peanut butter.

All legumes. These can be canned or dried. Legumes include but are not limited to dried beans, pinto beans, split peas, lentils, black eyed peas, kidney beans, black beans, cannellini beans, white beans.

All quality oils including but not limited to olive, canola, grape seed, peanut, and sesame.

Beverages: spring water, distilled water or other pure waters.

Other: tofu, soy products, vinegar, seasonings, salt, herbs and spices.

Foods to avoid on the Daniel Fast

All meat and animal products including but not limited to beef, lamb, pork, poultry, and fish.

All dairy products including but not limited to milk, cheese, cream, butter, and eggs.

All sweeteners including but not limited to sugar, raw sugar, honey, syrups, molasses, and cane juice.

All leavened bread including Ezekiel Bread (it contains yeast and honey) and baked goods.

All refined and processed foods products including but not limited to artificial flavorings, food additives, chemicals, white rice, white flour, and foods that contain artificial preservatives.

All deep fried foods including but not limited to potato chips, French fries, corn chips.

All solid fats including shortening, margarine, lard and foods high in fat.

Beverages including but not limited to coffee, tea, herbal teas, carbonated beverages, energy drinks, and alcohol.

Remember, READ THE LABELS!

What is the Daniel Fast?

The Daniel Fast is named after the prophet whose name also titles the Old Testament’s Book of Daniel. His name means “God Is My Judge,” which he upheld with his unshakable consecration to Yahweh and his loyalty to God’s chosen people.

He was deported from Jerusalem as a teenager in 605 B.C. to Babylon where he lived for more than sixty years. This deportation was prophesied by Isaiah, “And they shall take away some of your sons who will descend from you, whom you will beget; and they shall be eunuchs in the palace of the king of Babylon.”

So Daniel was among those sons . . . initially serving as a trainee in Nebuchadnezzar’s court and later was an adviser to foreign kings. The expansion of the Babylonian Empire required many skilled and educated workmen. Much of this manpower was found through the slaves. Because of their wisdom, knowledge, and handsome appearance, four young Hebrews were selected for the training program. The outstanding character of Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah locked in their positions in the king’s palace. It was Daniel that rose to the top and excelled all the wise men of the vast empire.

In Daniel 1:1-21, we find the model for the Daniel Fast. The four young men were to become servants of the king. Nebuchadnezzar instructed the master of the eunuchs to feed them a daily provision of the king’s delicacies and of the wine which he drank. Most people would want to eat “like a king,” but Daniel had a higher calling. He did not want to defile himself with these foods that were not consistent with the Jewish dietary laws.

Daniel requested a plain diet from the chief of the eunuchs. The chief  was very concerned that granting Daniel the plain foods would leave him weak and emaciated. And then the king would behead the chief for not obeying his command.

Daniel negotiated with the chief, asking for a trial period, “Please test your servants for ten days, and let them give us vegetables to eat and water to drink. Then let our appearance be examined before you, and the appearance of the young men who eat the portion of the king’s delicacies; and as you see fit, so deal with your servants.”

At the end of the ten days, Daniel and his three other companions looked better and fatter in flesh than all the other young men who ate the portion of the king’s delicacies.

So Daniel and his friends were allowed to remain on their diet. God rewarded the young men with knowledge and skill . . . and the king found them to be ten times better in wisdom and understanding than all his magicians and astrologers.

So the Daniel fast is limiting ones diet to vegetables and water, and at the same time increasing time in the Word of God and prayer. This is not a fast to lose weight, although that certainly will happen. And it’s not a diet to improve your health, yet you will likely feel better than you have felt for some time. Instead, the Daniel Fast is a time to consecrate yourself unto the Lord in a desire to draw closer to Him.

Welcome To The Daniel Fast

Welcome to the Daniel Fast. We hope to provide thorough information about the Daniel Fast and offer support and encouragement for the thousands of men and women who will engage in the fast in 2008. The Fasting Movement is capturing the attention of more and more Christians as they enter into the New Year!

HandJournalHandJournalHandJournalPlease read the posts to learn about what the Daniel Fast is all about. If you are experienced in fasting, you probably are already aware of the Daniel Fast. Please share your experiences and comments with us if that’s the case. If you are new to fasting, please read about it here and then if you have questions, please ask! We truly to want to serve this community of believers who want to devote themselves to prayer and fasting using the Daniel Fast.

Vegetarian Chili

This is a very easy to prepare and hearty meal. I make this even when I’m not on the Daniel Fast! 2 medium-sized green peppers, chopped

1 medium-sized yellow onion, chopped

1 zucchini, sliced

1 yellow squash, sliced

2 tablespoons salad oil

2 tablespoons chili powder

¾ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon ground red peppers

2 cups corn kernels (fresh or frozen)

2 16 oz. cans tomatoes (juice and all)

2 16 oz. cans pinto beans (juice and all)

2 16 oz. cans black beans (juice and all)

1   4 oz. can mild green chilies

1   4 oz. can of tomato paste

[When I make this during non-fasting times, I also add 1 tablespoon of sugar with the other spices.]

Chop and sauté in oil the peppers and onions. Add the sliced squashes, chili powder, salt, ground red peppers, and corn. When all the vegetables are soft but still firm, add the tomatoes, all the beans, the green chilies, and the tomato paste. Stir until just blended.

Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat. Let simmer for 20 minutes stirring occasionally to prevent sticking.

Yield: 6 generous servings

 I featured this recipe in my book titled Out of the Rat Race published in 1994 by Servant Publications.